Live-in Caregiver Program Canada (LMIA)

Live-in Caregivers, who would like to come to Canada and are qualified to provide care for children, seniors or people with disabilities in private homes without supervision, must meet various selection criteria to be eligible for the Live‑in Caregiver Program in Canada.

  1. A positive Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) from an employer in Canada

Before hiring you, your employer must have:

  • applied to Employment and Social Development Canada / Service Canada (ESDC/SC) to have their job offer reviewed; and
  • received a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment(LMIA) from ESDC/SC.

NOTE: If you are already in the Live-in Caregiver Program (LCP) and wish to change jobs while remaining in the LCP, you may do so. Your employer will need to apply for an LMIA that includes the live-in arrangement.

If the employer receives a positive LMIA, you will be able to live in the home of your new employer and be able to apply for permanent residence through the LCP when you have met the work requirement.

ESDC/SC will assess your employer’s job offer and the employment contract to be sure that it meets the requirements for wages and working conditions and the provincial/territorial labour and employment standards, and that there are no Canadians or permanent residents available to do the work. If ESDC/SC finds the job offer acceptable, they will issue a positive LMIA to your employer.

You will need to submit a copy of the positive LMIA when you apply for a work permit.

  1. A written contract with your future employer, signed by you and the employer

You and your future employer are legally required to sign a written employment contract. You must submit the signed contract with your work permit application. This must be the same employment contract submitted to ESDC/SC by your employer, unless you provide an explanation of any changes (for example, a new start date).

The written employment contract will ensure there is a fair working arrangement between you and your employer.

 

  1. Successful completion of the equivalent of a Canadian secondary school education

You must have successfully completed the equivalent of Canadian high school education (secondary school). Because of the differences in school systems across Canada, it is not possible to give a precise number of years. In most provinces, it takes 12 years of schooling to obtain a Canadian high school diploma. The immigration officer assessing your application will let you know what is needed.

  1. At least six months’ training or at least one year of full-time paid work experience as a caregiver or in a related field or occupation (including six months with one employer) in the past three years

To claim work experience, you need to have worked for one year, including at least six months of continuous employment for the same employer. This work experience must be in a field or occupation specific to what you will do as a live-in caregiver. This experience must have been acquired within the three years immediately before the day on which you make an application for a work permit as a caregiver.

To claim training, it must have been full-time training in a classroom setting. Areas of study could be early childhood education, geriatric care, pediatric nursing or first aid.

  1. Good knowledge of English or French

You must be able to speak, read and understand either English or French so that you can function on your own in your employer’s home. For example, you must be able to call emergency services if they are needed, and to understand labels on medication. You will be unsupervised for most of the day and may have to communicate with someone outside the home. You can also read and understand your rights and obligations if you can function in English or French.

  1. A work permit before you enter Canada

To participate in the Live-in Caregiver Program, you must make an application for an initial live-in caregiver work permit at a visa office outside Canada.

If your application is successful, you will receive a letter of introduction from the Canadian visa office responsible for your area. You will need to present this letter to the Border Services Officer upon arrival in Canada in order to obtain your work permit.

 

Inadmissibility

Some people are inadmissible–they are not allowed to come to Canada. Several things can make you inadmissible, including involvement in criminal activity, in human rights violations or in organized crime.

You can also be inadmissible for security, health or financial reasons. Find out more about inadmissibility.

 

Information from: www.cic.gc.ca

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